Corinth Monument: Acrocorinth
Collection:   Corinth
Type:   Monument
Name:   Acrocorinth
Description:   Acrocorinth (575 meters high) was described by the Roman historian Polybius as one of the “fetters of Greece” because it controlled not only the route across the Isthmus, but also the pass between the Isthmus and Mount Oneion leading south towards Cleonai and Argos, and the coastal road west to Sikyon. The earliest fortifications now extant date to the later 4th century B.C. These were breached by Demetrius Poliorcetes from the location of the Sysipheum and later reduced and rendered indefensible by Mummius in 146 B.C. The present fortifications largely represent work and rework of the Byzantine, Ottoman, Venetian and Early Modern periods. Within the walls are the remains of the Ottoman period described by various travelers including Evliya Çelebi in 1668 and Wheler and Spon in 1676. They include the remains of mosques, fountains and houses. Next to the Upper Peirene fountain are the barracks of King Otto’s Bavarian garrison.
Site:   Acrocorinth
City:   Ancient Corinth
Country:   Greece
References:   Publication: Blegen et al., Corinth 3.1, 1930
Publication: Carpenter & Bon, Corinth 3.2, 1936
Publication: MacKay, Hesperia 37.4, 1968
Plans and Drawings (13)
Images (544)
Notebook: 90a